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Working together for a cleaner Baltic Sea
Baltic sea story
Summary

Yara is working to reverse unwanted effects on the Baltic Sea region, using knowledge and technology to reduce nitrogen leakage from fields. This effort, linked to the EU Baltic Sea Strategy, has wide-ranging implications for all the nations in the region.

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Working together for a cleaner Baltic Sea

Oslo, October 17, 2013

Yara's work to reverse unwanted effects on the Baltic Sea region continues, using knowledge and technology to reduce nitrogen leakage from fields.

This effort, linked to the EU Baltic Sea Strategy, includes farmers, researchers, universities, governments and businesses - working together to turn the region into one of the most progressive agricultural regions on the globe, through a public-private cooperation.


"If I can contribute to improving the water in the Baltic Sea, then I would very much like to be involved."

Ebbe Persson, a Baltic Sea demo farmer from Trelleborg

This work has wide-ranging implications for all the nations in the region, where the sea is an integral part of life - the initiatives affect not only agriculture, but fishing, tourism and related industries.


A new Yara video gives voice to both Swedish residents and participants in the development of demo farms around the Baltic Sea, where best agricultural practices using new, innovative approaches and technologies - such as Yara's N-Sensor, N-Tester and P-TraP - allow farmers to achieve extreme nutrient efficiency in fertilizer application, reducing run-off and improving yields.


"In my capacity of having a demonstration farm I have received quite a number of study visits from other countries. I have had visitors from Estonia, Denmark and Finland. So we are trying to share a few experiences so that we can help each other," says Ebbe Persson, a Baltic Sea demo farmer from Trelleborg.


"Development has moved apace in the last few years. We have been working a lot on N-Sensor and the N-Tester," says Gunilla Frostgård, Chief Agronomist Yara Sweden. "We take a very positive view of this increased cooperation and since we are now all able to work together and be united in a common strategy, we believe this will take off and have an even greater impact."


Combining business interests with combating global challenges to improve societal conditions is part of Yara's new Creating Impact strategy. The goal in the Baltic Sea region is to reverse environmental damage and restore and even improve the area's agricultural competitiveness and productivity.


"If I can contribute to improving the water in the Baltic Sea, then I would very much like to be involved," says Ebbe. "Many people in the world are starving. We need food and this means we need to produce a lot of first-class grains and anything else that can be used as food. We can then minimize emissions and we'll be on the right track."


The Yara commitment to reduce runoff and leakage of nitrogen fertilizers is the company’s second, following the original 2010 commitment: to treat 100 hectares of the most vulnerable land in Finland with gypsum. Research results show that gypsum reduces phosphorus run-off by up to 60 percent.

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